Jervey is pleased to offer our patients state-of-the-art eye surgeries in our Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC). Our ASC has received accreditation by numerous organizations, including AAAHC, Medicare/Medicaid, and it is also licensed by DHEC.

We perform more than 3,000 successful procedures for patients each year, including cataract extraction, intraocular lens (IOL) placement, eye muscle surgery, cornea transplant, retinal surgery, glaucoma surgery, and LASIK. Operating since 1999, our ASC was one of the first privately-held, physician-owned surgery centers for eye health in Upstate South Carolina.

When you need it most, count on our top-notch staff of surgeons, nurses, anesthesiologists, and support staff. Our goal is to give you the highest-quality surgical eye care available, all under the convenience of a provider you know and a single bill for all services.

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Meet our specialists

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William H.
Ballinger, Jr.

Dr. William H. Ballinger Jr., M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 1985

Diplomate, National Board of Medical Examiners, 1980

Professional Training

Fellowship - Cornea and External Disease Department of Ophthalmology Vanderbilt University School of Medicine 1987 – 1988

Internship Greenville Hospital System Greenville, SC 1979 - 1980

Residency - Department of Ophthalmology Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Nashville, TN — 1980 – 1983 Chief Resident – 1983

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital –Sr. Active Staff

Educational Background

Clemson University, Clemson, SC 1973 – 1975

Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, SC — 1975 – 1979 Medical Degree: June 1979

Medical Licensure

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, International Society of Refractive Surgery

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Chief, Department of Ophthalmology USAF Regional Hospital Langley Langley Air Force Base, VA July 6, 1983 – July 5, 1987

Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology USAF Physician Assistants Phase II Training Program University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center July 1983 – June 1986

Greenville 1988-present

Jervey Leadership Founding member 1994 Board Member 1994-1996

Honors & Awards

Five Year Accelerated Medical Program – South Carolina 1973

United States Air Force Health Professions Scholarship Recipient 1975

Eagle Elite Award, USAF 1985

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David
Bowden

Dr. David M. Bowden, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology 1993

Recertified 2003

Professional Training

Internship Lloyd Nolan Hospital Fairfield, AL 1988 – 1989

Residency - Storm Eye Institute Medical University Of South Carolina Charleston, SC 1989 – 1992

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

Birmingham Southern College Birmingham, AL Degree: B.S. Graduated: June 1983

University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham, AL Degree: M.D. Graduated: June 1988

Medical Licensure

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Practice Experience

Easley 1992-2001

Greenville 2001-present

Jervey Leadership - Founding Member 1994

Honors & Awards

Volloton Award for Academic Excellence Storm Eye Institute – 1991

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society

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William E.
Caldwell

Dr. William E.H. Caldwell, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology 1995

Recertification 2005

Professional Training

Transitional Internship University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, Arkansas 1989

Ophthalmology Residency University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, Arkansas 1990 – 1994

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

Wofford College

Medical Licensure

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Practice Experience

Greenville 1994-present

Jervey Leadership - Founding member 1994

State & Community Activities

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society

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Famin
Chou

Dr. Famin Chou, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, National Board of Medical Examiners, 1993

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 1997

Recertified, 2007

Professional Training

Ophthalmology Residency Milwaukee Eye Institute Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1993-1996

Vitreoretinal Fellowship LSU Eye Center Louisiana State University Medical Center New Orleans, Louisiana 1996-1998

Transitional Medicine Internship Oakwood Hospital

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan BS, Biology, High Honors 1985-1988

Wayne State University School of Medicine Detroit, Michigan 1988-1992 Dearborn, Michigan 1992-1993 MD, with Distinction

Medical Licensure

California

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, American Society of Retina Specialists

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Greenville 1998-present

Honors & Awards

Phi Beta Kappa

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society

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Sulene L.
Chi

Dr. Sulene L. Chi, M.D., PhD.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 2014

Diplomate, National Board of Medical Examiners, 2007

Professional Training

Ophthalmology Residency Duke Eye Center 2008-2011 Durham, NC

Ph.D., Department of Pathology -The Graduate School, Duke University 2001-2005

Fellowship in Oculoplastic Surgery, Duke Eye Center Durham, NC 2011-2013

Intership, Internal Medicine Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC 2007-2008

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital

Educational Background

Princeton University - Princeton, NJ A.B., Chemistry 1995-1999

Duke University School of Medicine Durham, NC M.D. 1999-2007

Medical Licensure

South Carolina

North Carolina

Society Affiliations

Member, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Honors & Awards

The Heed Ophthalmic Foundation - Heed Fellow 2012 - 2013

Duke University School of Medicine - Medical Scientist Training Program Fellowship, NIH 1999-2007

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Summer Research Fellowship 1994-1997

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Steven E.
Civiletto

Dr. Steven E. Civiletto, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 1980

Recertified 2000, 2010

Professional Training

Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Texas Cullen Eye Institute Fellowship, Ocular Inflammatory and Infectious Disease – 1979 Supervised by Dan B. Jones, M.D.

Internship - Baylor College of Medicine Affiliated Hospitals Houston, Texas Internship – Internal Medicine – 1975-76

Residency - University of Miami School of Medicine Miami Florida Bascom Palmer Eye Institute Residency – Ophthalmology 1976-79 Chief Resident – 1978-79

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan A.B. May 6, 1972 Cellular Biology Graduated Cum Laude

Baylor College of Medicine Houston Texas M.D. – May 30, 1975

Medical Licensure

Texas

Florida

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Board of Ophthalmology

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Fellow, American College of Surgeons

Member, American Medical Association

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Dallas, Texas – 1980 – 2000

Simpsonville, SC – 2000 – present

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Mark H.
Cook

Dr. Mark H. Cook, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology 1987

Professional Training

Flexible Internship: Brooke Army Medical Center July 1981 – June 1982

General Medical Officer 48th Medical Battalion, 2d Armor Division Fort Hood, TX 1982 – 1983

Military Work Experience: Staff Ophthalmologist & Chief of Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Service Winn Army Community Hospital Fort Stewart, Georgia July 1986 – June 1989

Ophthalmology Residency: Brooke Army Medical Center July 1983 – June 1986

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

University of Iowa B.S. Degree 1977

University of Iowa M.D. Degree conferred 1981

Medical Licensure

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Practice Experience

Easley 1989-present

Jervey Leadership Founding member - 1994 Board Member 1997-present

Honors & Awards

Army Commendation Medal (1989)

Technical Research Award (1986)

Potential Scientific Merit Award (1984)

Army Expert Field Medical Badge (1982)

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James W.
Culclasure

Dr. James W. Culclasure, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 2003

Professional Training

Internship - Internal Medicine Richland Memorial Hospital Columbia, SC 1997 - 1998

Residency - General Ophthalmology University of Virginia School of Medicine Charlottesville, VA

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

Emory and Henry College, B.A, B.S. 1992

University of South Carolina School of Medicine Columbia, SC - 1997

Medical Licensure

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Lynchburg, VA 2002-2004

Greenville, SC 2004-present

Jervey Leadership Board Member 2007-present

Honors & Awards

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society

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Adam R.
Easterling

Dr. Adam R. Easterling, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 2009

Professional Training

Internship/Ophthalmology University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga , TN 2002 - 2005

Ophthalmology - Duke University Eye Center Durham, NC 2005-2007

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital –Active Staff

Educational Background

Georgia Institute of Technology Bachelor of Industrial Engineering 1997 High Honors

University of South Carolina School of Medicine Magna Cum Laude – 2002

Medical Licensure

South Carolina - 2000

Society Affiliations

Member, American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Member, Association of American Physicians and Surgeons

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Practice Experience

Simpsonville 2007-present

Honors & Awards

Edward K. Isbey, MD Resident Award For Excellence in Clinical Care, Ethics, and Research Duke University Eye Center

K. Alexander Dastgheib, M.D. Eye Surgery Award For Excellence in Surgical Skill and Judgment Duke University Eye Center

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Anthony P.
Johnson

Dr. Anthony P. Johnson, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 1987

Recertified 2007

Professional Training

Internship Flexible Surgical Greenville Hospital Systems Greenville, South Carolina 1981 – 1982

Ophthalmology – Tulane University Medical School New Orleans, Louisiana 1982 – 1985

Chief Resident – Tulane University Medical School New Orleans, Louisiana 1984 – 1985

Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Zane F. Pollard, M.D. Atlanta, Georgia 1985 - 1986

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Sr. Active Staff

Greenville Hospital System – Sr. Active Staff

Educational Background

Texas Tech University (Chemistry) Lubbock, Texas 1974 – 1977

University of Texas Medical School 1977- 1981 San Antonio, Texas

Medical Licensure

Texas

South Carolina - 2000

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Fellow, American College of Surgeons

Fellow, American Academy of Pediatrics

Member, American Medical Association

Member, American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

Member, American Eye Study Club

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Greenville 1986-present

Jervey Leadership Founding Member 1994 President 1994 - Present Managing Partner 1995 - Present

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Christopher B.
Myers

Dr. Christopher Blake Myers, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology 1994
Recertified 2004

Diplomate, National Board of Medical Examiners, 1983

Professional Training

Transitional Internship
Greenville Memorial Hospital
Greenville, SC 1987 - 1988

Ophthalmology Residency
USC College of Medicine
Richland Memorial Hospital
Columbia, SC 1988 - 1992

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

College of Charleston
Charleston, South Carolina
B.S., 1983 Suma Cum Laude

Medical University of South Carolina
Charleston, South Carolina
M.D., 1987

Medical Licensure

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Jervey Leadership - Founding Member 1994

Honors & Awards

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society

American Academy of Ophthalmology Distinguished Service Award

South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology Political Action Award

State & Community Activities

2000 President South Carolina Society of Ophthamology

2004 Chairman Greenville Free Medical Clinic Board of Directors

2007 - 2011 Chairman South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology Political Action committee

2009 - 2011 Greenville Technical College Charter High School Board of Directors

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Harold E.
Shaw

Dr. Harold E. Shaw, Jr., M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, National Board of Medical Examiners, 1974

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 1978 Recertified 2004, 2011

Professional Training

Straight Medicine Internship Baylor College of Medicine Affiliated Hospitals, Texas Medical Center Houston, Texas 1973 – 1974

Research Fellowship Duke University Eye Center Durham, NC 1974

Ophthalmology Residency Duke University Eye Center Durham, NC 1975 – 1977

Neuro-ophthalmology Fellowship Bascom Palmer Eye Institute University of Miami School of Medicine Miami, FL 1978

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Sr. Active Staff

Greenville Hospital System – Sr. Active Staff

Duke University Eye Center Consulting Associate

Educational Background

Davidson College Davidson, NC B.S., 1969

Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, SC M.D., 1973

Medical Licensure

North Carolina

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, American Medical Association

Member, American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Member, American Eye Study Club

Member, North American Neuro-ophthalmology Society

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, South Carolina Medical Association

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Greenville 1979-present

Jervey Leadership Founding Member 1994 Board Member 1994 - Present Chairman of the Board 1994-present

Honors & Awards

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society

American Academy of Ophthalmology Honor Award

American Academy of Ophthalmology Senior Achievement Award

American Academy of Ophthalmology Secretariat Award

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Brian W.
Shelley

Dr. Brian W. Shelley, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 2007

Professional Training

Internship Baptist Health Systems Birmingham, AL 2002 – 2003

Ophthalmology Residency - University of Alabama Birmingham, AL 2003 - 2006

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

University of Virginia Bachelor of Arts with Distinction

University of South Carolina School of Medicine Magna Cum Laude – 2002

Medical Licensure

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (1998 – present)

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Greenville 2006-present

Honors & Awards

Phi Beta Kappa

Alpha Omega Alpha honor society

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Brian A.
Welcome

Dr. Brian A. Welcome, M.D.

Certification

Diplomate, American Board of Ophthalmology, 2002

Professional Training

Internship - General Medicine
Roger Williams Medical Center
Providence, RI 1997 - 1998

Ophthalmology Residency - Brown University
School of Medicine
Rhode Island Hospital
Providence, RI

Fellowship Glaucoma Dean A. McGee Eye Institute
Oklahoma City, OK 2001 - 2002

Staff Appointments

Bon Secours Saint Francis Hospital – Active Staff

Educational Background

Dartmouth College, Hanover NH
Bachelor of Arts 1989 - 1993

Medical School State University of New York
Health Science Center at Syracuse
Syracuse, NY 1993 - 1997

Medical Licensure

Oklahoma

South Carolina

Society Affiliations

Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Member, American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (1998 – present)

Member, American Medical Association

Member, American Glaucoma Society

Member, American Eye Study Club

Member, South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology

Member, Greenville County Medical Society

Practice Experience

Greenville 2002-present

What is a cataract?

When we are young, the natural lens inside of our eye is both clear and flexible. Normal, natural, age-related changes result in the lens becoming both less flexible and less clear. This decreased flexibility interferes with the ability of the eye to change focus from distance to near, and is the reason most people will need reading glasses or bifocals by their early to mid 40s. This is called presbyopia. The decrease in the clarity of the lens is what we refer to as a cataract. This can be seen in most patients by their 60s, and in some patients even younger. The yellowing and clouding of the lens (cataract) may cause blurred vision, dulled vision, sensitivity to light and glare, and/or ghost images. Early on glasses may be able to help correct vision even with a cataract present. Eventually the cataract will progress so that even with the best possible glasses the vision is not adequate.

Decreased flexibility of natural lens = Presbyopia

Decreased clarity of natural lens = Cataract

When is the right time for cataract surgery?
When the cataract changes vision so that even with the best possible glasses your daily activities are affected, the cataract would need to be removed in order to allow for improved vision. Because the visual needs of different people are very different, this timing can vary widely. If your vision can be corrected with glasses, but you would prefer to have surgery in order to decrease the need for glasses, this is considered elective / refractive surgery that is not medically necessary and would not be covered by insurance. Surgery is the only way to remove a cataract. You can decide not to have the cataract removed, but without surgery, your vision loss from the cataract will continue to get worse. We are unable to predict how quickly or slowly that this may occur.
How will removing the cataract effect my vision?
In standard cataract surgery, the primary goal is to remove the cloudy, opacified natural lens and replace it with a clear artificial lens implant (intraocular lens – IOL), so that with proper correction (glasses, contact lenses) the patient is able to see more clearly. Because we are able to choose the power of IOL to implant, we also have some control over what type of glasses prescription a patient will have after surgery. Two important factors to consider regarding expectations for vision after cataract surgery are the level of astigmatism and the desire for better vision at distance, near, or both without glasses. These will be discussed further below in relation to lens implant options for astigmatism and presbyopia. It is also important to realize that cataract surgery will not correct other causes of decreased vision, such as glaucoma, diabetes, corneal irregularities, or age-related macular degeneration. Although the technology for IOLs is continuing to improve, there is no lens implant option that is able to replicate the clarity and range of focus of the healthy natural lens in a young person.
IOL – More information about measuring your IOL
The power of the lens implant for an individual patient is determined based on several different measurements made before surgery. Calculations are then performed to estimate the power of the IOL needed. Fractions of a millimeter difference in the healing response can have a significant effect on the glasses prescription needed after surgery. Even with the best possible measurements and calculations there is no guarantee of the final result equaling the estimation, and a different glasses prescription may be needed than what was desired. Dry eyes, contact lens wear, or corneal irregularities can make the measurements difficult or inaccurate. Contact lenses must be left out for a period of time before these measurements – make sure your doctor knows if you wear contacts and discuss how long to leave them out. Patients who are highly nearsighted or highly farsighted have the greatest risk of differences between planned and actual outcomes. Patients who have had LASIK or other refractive surgeries are also especially difficult to measure precisely.
Information about treating Astigmatism
Astigmatism is related to the shape of the cornea. Ideally the corneal surface is perfectly round (like a basketball) and focuses light into a sharp point. In many people, the cornea is steeper in one axis than another (more like a football). This shape can keep the eye from being able to focus light clearly. Glasses or contacts are in most cases able to easily account for astigmatism in the prescription to allow a clear focus. Patients with astigmatism now have options to be able to help correct the astigmatism at the time of cataract surgery to decrease the need for glasses after surgery. The options for astigmatism treatment are:
  1. Glasses – The basic option would be implantation of a standard IOL to correct for nearsightedness or farsightedness, and continuing to wear glasses or contacts postoperatively to correct for the astigmatism. Depending on the level of astigmatism, patients will likely need glasses for most daily activities at all distances. This option would not result in extra out-of-pocket expense.
  2. Corneal Relaxing Incisions – For low to moderate levels of astigmatism, small incisions in the cornea can be made to induce a change in its shape to reduce or eliminate the astigmatism. This can be performed with a laser or a diamond blade at the time of cataract surgery. The benefit is reducing dependency on glasses after surgery. When performed with a standard IOL, glasses would still likely be needed for either distance or near, but not both. These can also be used with multifocal or accommodating IOLs to improve both distance and near vision without glasses. Insurance does not cover the expense of any surgical correction of astigmatism, which results in additional out of pocket costs.
  3. Toric IOL – For moderate to high levels of astigmatism, special toric IOLs can be used which account for and offset the eye’s natural astigmatism, allowing for improved vision without glasses after surgery. These can be an excellent option for patients with significant astigmatism. Again, insurance does not cover the expense of any surgical correction of astigmatism, and the extra costs associated with the use of a toric IOL are paid by the patient.
Presbyopia and alternatives for near vision after surgery?
As discussed above, presbyopia is the natural loss of our eyes’ ability to change focus associated with stiffening of the lens. This begins to affect everyone by their early to mid 40s, and is the reason we need reading glasses or bifocals. Because the natural lens is removed at the time of cataract surgery, it does not matter whether someone needed reading glasses before surgery, whether they were nearsighted or farsighted, or even their age. The ability to see clearly at different distances after surgery is determined entirely by the type and prescription of the IOL implanted. A standard, monofocal IOL is not able to change focus, and cannot provide clear vision at both distance and near without glasses. For all of the options listed below, the level of astigmatism also affects the clarity of vision without glasses (see section above on astigmatism).
  1. Glasses – You can choose to have a monofocal (single focus) IOL implanted and plan to wear glasses (or possibly contact lenses). The prescription of the IOL can be targeted for distance vision so that glasses are needed more for near, or targeted for near vision and needing glasses more for distance.
  2. Monovision – This involves using IOLs with two different powers, one for near vision in one eye, and one for distance vision in the other eye. This combination of a distance eye and a reading eye is called monovision. It can allow you to read and see at a distance without glasses. Many patients who wear contacts or who have had refractive surgery have monovision and are happy with it. This option does have some limitations, and not all patients are good candidates for this approach.
  3. Multifocal IOL – This type of IOL can correct for both distance and near vision in the same eye. Because multifocal IOLs are very sensitive to any problems in other parts of the eye, not everyone is a good candidate for multifocal IOLs. The benefit of multifocal IOLs is deceased dependency on glasses after surgery. Choosing this option will lead to higher out-of-pocket expenses since insurance companies only pay for a monofocal (single focus) lens. Multifocal IOLs will decrease one’s dependency on glasses for many tasks, but not necessarily for all tasks in all situations. These lenses may also have some increased risks of glare and/or halos, especially at night.
  4. Accommodative IOL – This is a different type of IOL that is able to provide clear distance vision, as well as an improved range of focus for intermediate and near vision by utilizing the eye’s natural focusing mechanism. Intermediate vision is typically good without glasses, and near vision is better than with a monofocal IOL, although low power reading glasses may still be needed for small or prolonged near tasks. Accommodating IOLs are less sensitive to other eye problems than multifocal IOLs, so many patients who would not be good candidates for a multifocal would still be able to have an accommodative lens. As with multifocal IOLs, the extra cost associated with the accommodative IOL is not covered by insurance.